ASIS&T Career Profile
Name:  Caryn Anderson
Job Title:  Integration Research Manager, ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security, Australian National University
 
Brief Career Biography: 
My career has been extremely diverse and information science has actually been a field where I have been able to put all of my past experiences to use in different ways. I have a bachelors degree from the College of Communication at Boston University in broadcasting and film and worked in radio, TV and film early on. I then spent time in various industries including hotel, mutual funds and law before moving into non-profit management (early childhood education, teen pregnancy and the arts) and then into public policy analysis and program evaluation consulting. I completed my masters in library and information science at Simmons College in Boston in 2004 and began working on projects developing digital libraries and teaching technology for information professionals in the masters program. I went on to manage the doctoral programs at Simmons GSLIS while simultaneously doing research with an Australian scholar on the developing discipline of integration and implementation sciences (the development of theory and methods for solving complex, multi-disciplinary social problems: http://www.anu.edu.au/iisn). I have recently moved to Australia to contribute my knowledge management skills to the development of integration and implementation sciences research to support improvements in the areas of policing and security in Australia. It's been a tremendous journey and I'll reiterate that the information skills I've gained in this field are fantastically applicable to all types of domains. They have given me the flexibility to move around in different circles and always be able to make significant contributions.
 
Benefits of ASIS&T: 
ASIS&T has been great for keeping me up to date on the latest developments in information science and technology at the intersection of librarian-type stuff and computing-type stuff. I continually find that things I learn about through ASIS&T (both formal communication and network relationships) put me ahead of the curve with my colleagues. I'm usually the one to be able to suggest a new tool or strategy for more effective information management. The scope of interests is also terrific. I like to say that many ASIS&T members are either programmers who understand people or librarians who can code. It's a terrific intersection. It's the people that really make this organization so valuable for me. Through my involvement in chapters, SIGs (special interest groups) and committees I've had a chance to engage with so many really intelligent and interesting people who are quick to share ideas, mentor, and help each other connect with relevant knowledge and other professionals. In just five years I've developed an enormous network of information professionals around the world ranging from researchers to librarians to metadata specialists to information architects.
 
Advice for New Information Professionals: 
1. Get involved in SIGs, chapters and committees - This is where I have been able to develop the amazing number of relationships around the world that keep me in the loop and give me the confidence to feel that I'm on top of developments. Although I was new to the profession very recently, meeting so many people through my involvement allowed me to connect people with each other even if I didn't have actual direct content knowledge myself. As a result, my network has continued to grow and I feel like I can get help or advice or even career opportunities from so many sources.

2. Subscribe to listservs - Lots of the listservs of ASIS&T SIGs are free to subscribe to (http://mail.asis.org/mailman/listinfo). This can give you a great idea of the types of topics that are discussed. Also, don't be afraid to contact the list owners directly (or SIG or Chapter officers: http://www.asis.org/sigschapters.html) and just indicate that you are interested in the topic and could they suggest some additional resources. Everyone in ASIS&T is extremely accessible and willing to help you get oriented and connected.

3. Go to conferences! - This is the best place to connect with people. Again, all the ASIS&T members are really accessible and good-humoured, so at the ASIS&T conferences (Annual Meeting, Information Architecture Summit: http://www.asis.org/conferences.html) just tell somebody what you are interested in and they will connect you with someone at the conference that can suggest good sessions or people to meet. Check the programs for past conferences to identify speakers or topics that may interest you. You might also want to check out the International Calendar of Information Science Conferences: http://icisc.neasist.org/