ASIS&T 2010 Annual Meeting
 Pittsburgh, PA, Oct. 22-27

Tracks

ASIS&T 2010 will consist of six tracks that span the breadth of information science:

Track 1 – Information Behavior 
Information needs, information seeking, information gaps and sense-making in various contexts including work, interests or every-day life activities by individuals or groups. 

Track 2 – Knowledge Organization 
Indexing, index construction, indexing languages, thesaurus construction, terminology, classification of information in any form, tagging (expert, user-based, automatic), filtering, metadata, standards for metadata, information architecture.

Track 3 – Information Systems, Interactivity and Design
The design, use and evaluation of interactive information technologies and systems, including interfaces and algorithms.

Track 4 – Information and Knowledge Management
Information and knowledge creation, transfer and use at the personal, group, organizational and societal levels. The management of the processes and systems that create, acquire, organize, store, distribute, and use information and/or knowledge. 

Track 5 – Information Use
How people re-purpose existing knowledge from a variety of sources (scientific, humanities, news, family, friends, colleagues), forms (articles, books, video, audio, tweets), locations (work, home, in transit) and mediums (cell-phones, PDAs, digital libraries) to advance knowledge, solve problems, improve information literacy, and learn.

Track 6 – Information in Context: Economic, Social, and Policy Perspectives
Copyright issues, policies and laws; information policy; privacy; personal rights vs. freedom of information; surveillance; regulation; international information flow& issues; spam

Because each of these tracks represents a generic aspect of information science, each may be focused by additional elements such as types of:

  • Organizations 
  • Information (by topic, genre, scale, medium, etc. )
  • Technology 
  • Information consumers 
  • Contexts 
  • Research theories and paradigms 
  • Methods 

Evaluation and measurement may be associated with almost any track. The size of each track will depend on the quality of submissions.


Track 1 – Information Behavior

Co-Chairs     Pertti Vakkari, University of Tampere
                        Karen Fisher, University of Washington

Description
We invite studies on how people experience information in different contexts (work, everyday, school, leisure), particularly with regard to affective, social, cognitive and physical factors. Concepts of key interest include the development, management and expression of information needs; nature of information seeking and sharing--including purposive, accidental, and avoidance.

Topics include but are not limited to:
Information needs, information seeking, information gaps and sense-making in various contexts including work, interests or every-day life activities by individuals or groups. 

Types of Submissions
Long and short papers, Posters, Demonstrations, Video, Panels and Workshops. See description of submission types for more information.


Track 2 – Knowledge Organization 

Co-Chairs    Jane Greenberg, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
                       Joe Tennis, University of Washington

Description
We invite research on the methods, theories, and epistemic assumptions present in knowledge organization, as well as empirical work that describes and/or models knowledge organization practices.

A key means for advancing our understanding of this core area of information science is comparative work. To this end, we want to encourage work that compares approaches, methods, and results of knowledge organization either across contexts, time, or technologies. 

Topics include, but are not limited to:
The development, assessment, comparison, and use of the full range of knowledge organization systems: indexing languages, thesauri, terminology, classification, taxonomy, and folksonomies.
Filtering, visualizing, processing, searching, and access via knowledge organization systems
Subject analysis, topical indexing, and tagging (expert, user-based, automatic)
Cultural, epistemological, social, and behavior aspects of knowledge organization 
The role of knowledge organization and knowledge organization systems in information architecture; metadata, standards for metadata
Ontological engineering, and knowledge organization development and analyses relating to the Semantic Web
Knowledge organization applications and curation 

Types of Submissions
Long and short papers, Posters, Demonstrations, Video, Panels and Workshops. See submission types.


Track 3 – Interactive Information & Design

Co-Chairs    Diane Kelly, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 
                       Luanne Freund, University of British Columbia

Description
How people use and communicate with information systems and information objects, the design of interactive technologies, algorithms, user interfaces, and diverse types of information systems and structures, including search and retrieval, browsing, information architecture, visualization, personalization and recommendation. 

Topics
The design, use and evaluation of interactive information technologies and systems, including interfaces and algorithms.

Types of Submissions
Long and short papers, Posters, Demonstrations, Video, Panels and Workshops. See submission types.


Track 4 – Information and Knowledge Management

Co-Chairs    Brian Detlor, McMaster University
                       Chun Wei Choo, University of Toronto

Topics
Topics that pertain to this track include, but are not limited to, the following: Information and knowledge creation, transfer and use at the personal, group, organizational and societal levels; 
The management of the processes and systems that create, acquire, organize, store, distribute, and use information and knowledge; Expertise, insights, and judgment in organizations; Knowledge capital; Social networking; Knowledge sharing; Communities of practice; Business intelligence; Content management; Document management; Workflow management; Collaboration systems; Portals; Groupware; Information and knowledge preservation and storage.

Description
This track invites papers on the broad topics of information management and knowledge management.

Information management concerns the management of the processes and systems that create, acquire, organize, store, distribute, and use information. The goal of information management is to help people and organizations access, process and use information efficiently and effectively. Doing so helps organizations operate more competitively and strategically, and helps people better accomplish their tasks and become better informed.

Knowledge management is about the management of the processes and systems that create, acquire, organize, store, distribute and use knowledge – the insight, expertise, judgements and interpretations of people. Knowledge can be tacit or explicit. Information is a fundamental building block of knowledge. 

Given the prominence and ever-increasing important role that Web and Internet technologies play in today’s wired world, information technologies have revolutionized and fundamentally altered how people and organizations go about creating, acquiring, organizing, storing, distributing, and using information and knowledge. Similarly information contexts (environments), and individual user characteristics (demographics, social roles, affective dispositions) shape information needs and uses, information behaviours, and ultimately how information and knowledge must be managed. Papers addressing such topics are highly relevant to this track.

Three or four papers submitted to this track will be selected for publication in the February 2011 issue of the International Journal of Information Management. Authors of selected papers will be required to augment or expand their papers (in accordance with the policies of IJIM and the ACM Digital Library) by mid September.

Types of Submissions
Long and short papers, Posters, Demonstrations, Video, Panels and Workshops. See description of submission types for more information.


Track 5 – Information Use

Co-Chairs    Catherine Blake, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana Champaign
                       Cecelia Brown, The University of Oklahoma

Topics
How people re-purpose existing knowledge from a variety of sources (scientific, humanities, news, family, friends, colleagues), forms (articles, books, video, audio, tweets), locations (work, home, in transit) and mediums (cell-phones, PDAs, digital libraries) to advance knowledge, solve problems, improve information literacy, and learn.

Types of Submissions
Long and short papers, Posters, Demonstrations, Video, Panels and Workshops. See description of submission types for more information.


Track 6 – Information in Context: Economic, Social, and Policy Perspectives

Co-Chairs    Howard Rosenbaum, University of Indiana 
                       Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University

Topics
Copyright issues, policies and laws; information policy; privacy; personal rights vs. freedom of information; surveillance; regulation; international information flow& issues; spam 

Description

Types of Submissions
Long and short papers, Posters, Demonstrations, Video, Panels and Workshops. See description of submission types for more information.