Journal of the Association for Information Science

 

Bert R. Boyce
 

1251

 RESEARCH

 

Satisfiers and Dissatisfiers: A Two-Factor Model for Website Design and
Evaluation
Ping Zhang and Gisela M. von Dran 
Published online 6 October 2000  

Since the Perspectives issue editor will comment on the Perspectives papers, we cover only the two regularly submitted papers beginning with Zhang and von Dran who suggest that factors influencing Website evaluation are either hygiene factors that insure functionality, or motivational factors that increase satisfaction and encourage return visits. After a review of Website evaluation studies they contend that a twofactor model explains that level of dislike of an interface comes from insufficient hygiene factors but the positive feelings toward a site are based in its motivational factors. Thirtynine students and professional staff were who were regular Web users grouped preidentified features into 305 different categories. A cluster analysis led to eleven categories and two were added to include surfing activity and cognitive outcome as motivator factors. A new set of 37 subjects were given 66 features to classify into the 13 categories and the result was 44 core features in 12 categories. Seventynine new subjects then characterized the factors and categories as hygiene or motivator, or unclear, or unclear by wording. Subjects were able to identify the two sorts of factors indicating the usability of the model

 

1253

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Reflections on Mira: Interactive Evaluation in Information Retrieval
 Mark Dunlop
Published online
25 October 2000

Once again we have a European Research Letter, this time from Mr. Mark Dunlop who reports upon MIRA, a threeyear project of six workshops and a conference funded by the European Union on evaluation frameworks for interactive and multimedia retrieval systems. In interactive systems suitability for endusers is as important as search engine performance, and the traditional evaluation model is not sufficient. Mizzaro's four dimensional relevance model incorporates depth of representation of sources, depth of user's needs, range of relevance judgements, and the degree of change over time. MIRA suggests using the first three dimensions at various levels of evaluation over time.
 

1269

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERSPECTIVES ISSUE ON  THE CHANGING COMMUNICATION SYSTEM OF SCIENCE: BEHAVIORAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS
 Introduction and Overview
 Julie M. Hurd
 Published online 31 October 2000

The system of scientific communication that has evolved over several centuries is now undergoing a transformation catalyzed by information technology and computer-based communication networks, particularly the Internet, that support instantaneous global transmission of text, images, and data. This issue of the Journal of the Association for Information Science Perspectives brings together a collection of papers that explore the behavioral and organizational aspects of the changing communication system of science.  
 

1276
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

  The Transformation of Scientific Communication: A Model for 2020
  Julie M. Hurd
  Published online 26 October 2000
   
Julie Hurd leads off the collection with an overview of the transformation
of scientific communication, "The Transformation of Scientific
Communication: A Model for 2020."  Drawing on the model developed by
William Garvey and Belver Griffith during the print on paper era, she
proposes a model for the future, perhaps the year 2020. The new paradigm is
one that might emerge from several recent initiatives that offer new
functionalities while recognizing enduring values
 

1279


 

 

 


 

 

 Debunking the Myth of the Nintendo Generation: How Doctoral Students
Introduce New Electronic Communication Practices into University Research
 Lisa M. Covi
 
Published online 31 October 2000
  
Lisa Covi's contribution to this Perspectives, "Debunking the Myth of the Nintendo Generation: How Doctoral Students Introduce New Electronic Communication Practices into University Research," explores the communication behaviors of students in research universities. While the students she studied often employed work practices that reinforced existing patterns in their disciplines, she is able to speculate on how electronic communication may ultimately transform doctoral education..
 

1284
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting Minds: Computer-Mediated Communication and Scientific Work
John P. Walsh, Stephanie Kucker, Nancy G. Maloney, and Shaul Gabbay
Published online 1 November 2000

John P. Walsh, Stephanie Kucker, Nancy Maloney, and Shaul Gabbay, in "Connecting Minds: CMC and Scientific Work," report preliminary findings from a survey of 333 scientists in four disciplines (experimental biology, mathematics, physics, and sociology.) They find that computer-mediated communication technologies (CMC) have become increasingly important in scientific work and that the Internet and electronic mail have enhanced scientific collaboration and productivity. Field-dependent variations in use of CMC are described.
 

1295
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not Just a Matter of Time: Field Differences and the Shaping of Electronic Media in Supporting Scientific Communication
Rob Kling and Geoffrey McKim
Published online 3 November 2000

Rob Kling and Geoffrey McKim provide their perspective on use of electronic media by scientists in "Not Just a Matter of Time: Field Differences and the Shaping of Electronic Media in Supporting Scientific Communication." They refute the common assumption that the emerging communication models of early-adopter fields such as high energy physics will predict the future of communication in other specialties. They argue, instead, that we will continue to see diverse practices based in discipline-specific culture and norms and that diversity will endure and shape the outcomes of some of the current publishing and communication initiatives.

1306

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharing Digitized Research-Related Information on the World Wide Web
Katherine W. McCain
Published online 26 October 2000

Katherine W. McCain describes her effort to document sharing of research-related information through the World Wide Web. She tracked references to data compilations, software, Websites, electronic files, and digitized images in journal articles indexed by the Institute for Scientific Information over a ten year time span. Her findings suggest that biology, chemistry, and astronomy, in particular, have exploited the potential of the Web as a medium for sharing digitized research-related information.

1321

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editorial Peer Review for Electronic Journals: Current Issues and Emerging Models
Ann C. Weller
Published online 1 November 2000
 
Ann C. Weller examines peer review in a digital environment in her contribution "Editorial Peer Review for Electronic Journals: Current Issues and Emerging Models." She describes some of the approaches being used to incorporate peer review into electronic publishing and highlights some of the discipline-specific variants that have emerged. She identifies issues that still require resolution.

1328

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Observations on Fraud and Scientific Integrity in a Digital Environment
 Marcel C. LaFollette
 Published online 31 October 2000
 
Marcel C. LaFollette considers ethical conduct in electronic publishing in "Observations on Fraud and Scientific Integrity in a Digital Environment." She identifies concerns deserving of special attention that include insuring integrity of content, building trust among authors, reviewers, and publishers, and protecting intellectual property. How these issues relate to digital media is explored in her analysis.

1334

 

 

 

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

1338

 

AUTHOR INDEX

1341
 

 

 SUBJECT INDEX

1347
 

     
     

2000 , Association for Information Science