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of the American Society for Information Science

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Volume 25, No. 3

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February / March 1999

 

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Everything's Coming Up Roses at
ASIS Mid-Year in Pasadena

by Louisa Toot

Images of the Rose Bowl and the "little old lady from Pasadena" are what spring to mind for many when they consider Pasadena; however, despite its California setting, Pasadena is rich in history and culture, and visitors don't have to look far to find engaging sightseeing activities. So while you are in town for the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, I encourage you to take a look around and enjoy the attractions that Pasadena has to offer!

May in Pasadena is one of the nicest times of the year; weather is mild with highs in the mid-70s and lows in the mid-50s. If the day is clear, one has a breathtaking view to the north of the San Gabriel mountain range, which we here in Southern California usually take for granted!

Flowers are in bloom year round in Pasadena. The rose is the official flower of the city; but irises, daffodils, camellias, gardenias, jacaranda trees and birds of paradise abound, as well.

The word Pasadena is a Chippewa Indian word that can be translated to mean "Crown of the Valley." The region which is now Pasadena was originally populated by Hahamonga tribe Indians before being settled by the Spanish in 1771. Pasadena officially became a city in 1886 and became known as a winter resort for wealthy families from the Midwest. Today, Pasadena takes up 23 square miles and has a culturally diverse population of over 138,900.

The city of Pasadena is well-known to architectural historians and boasts 33 properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Probably the most famous of these is The Gamble House, 4 Westmoreland Place, 626/793-3334. Both the house and its furnishings were designed by the famous Craftsman architects Charles and Henry Greene for David and Mary Gamble (Procter & Gamble) in 1908. Pasadena is home to many Greene & Greene and other Craftsman style buildings so if you are particularly interested in this architectural style you may want to visit the Pasadena Landmarks Web page.

Another historic home is the Wrigley Estate built from 1905-1914 by architect G. Lawrence Stimson for William Wrigley, Jr., of Wrigley's chewing gum fame. The mansion now serves as the Tournament of Roses Association headquarters. The sight is officially known as Tournament House and Wrigley Gardens, 391 S. Orange Grove Blvd., 626/449-4100, and is open free to the public.

If you don't have a chance to make it to any of the above then swing by the Castle Green Apartments at Raymond Ave. and Green St., 818/793-0359, while shopping or dining in Old Town. This impressive structure done in Moorish Colonial and Spanish architectural style was built in 1899 as an annex to the Hotel Green (no longer in existence). Organized tours are not available, but you can call the above number for an appointment to see inside.

If you haven't had your fill of architecture yet, two more sights located just south of Pasadena in Highland Park may be of interest: El Alisal, 200 East Avenue 43, 626/222-0546, and Heritage Square Museum, 3800 Homer St., 818/449-0193. El Alisal was the home of Charles F. Lummis, built by Lummis himself between 1898-1910. Lummis, a very colorful figure in Los Angeles history, was founder of the Southwest Museum, first editor of the Los Angeles Times and at one time was the city librarian. Heritage Square is an open air museum of "historically and architecturally significant buildings." Four Victorian Era buildings dating from 1865 to 1914 have been relocated to this site which preserves the structures and provides a unique opportunity for learning about southern California during Victorian times.

Pasadena accommodates several culturally diverse and unique museums. Perhaps the most well-known is The Huntington Library Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road, 626/405-2141. Here one can stroll through 150 acres of gardens, drink a cup of tea at the tea house (reservations required) and view notable works of art from 18th century Britain and France. Through May 30th the main exhibit at the Huntington is "The Great Experiment: George Washington and the American Republic," which includes manuscripts, rare documents, artifacts and art works giving a biographical account of Washington up to his presidency.

The Norton Simon Museum, 411 West Colorado Blvd., 626/449-6840, contains sculptures, paintings and etchings from the 14th to the 20th century. Here one can see masterpieces by Raphael, Rembrandt, Manet, Monet, Degas, Renoir, van Gogh, Cezanne and Picasso, as well as sculpture collections from India, Nepal, Thailand and Cambodia.

If you have an interest in the Asian arts then the Pacific Asia Museum, 46 North Los Robles Ave., 626/449-2742, is the place for you. Its main collection contains over 17,000 objects representative of art work from the Pacific Islands and Asia. Be sure to take a leisurely stroll by the koi pond in the center courtyard of the museum before you exit.

The Southwest Museum, 234 Museum Dr., 323/221-2164, is just up the road from El Alisal (Lummis' home) and is a museum, library and archive devoted to the American Indian. Lummis' keen ethnographical interest in Native Americans is what inspired him to start this museum. The library and archives comprise many of Lummis' writings and photographs.

If you go into withdrawal without your weekly shopping spree then there are several areas in Pasadena where you can get a quick fix and be merrily on your way. First and foremost is Old Town Pasadena located on Colorado Blvd. between Marengo Ave. and Pasadena Ave. This area had always been the heart of Pasadena business, but saw a decline in the 1950s when businesses moved just east of Old Town. As property values fell, buildings became rundown. In the 80s a move was made to revitalize the area, and now Old Town is the place to go for dining, entertainment and shopping. Along with major chains, such as the Gap, Pottery Barn and Barnes & Noble, are specialty boutiques, cafes, bakeries, bars and billiard halls.

If you are looking for a little less in the way of entertainment and a little more in the way of upscale shopping then South Lake Avenue is probably the area you should visit. On South Lake you can find specialty and garment shops such as Williams Sonoma, Eddie Bauer, Home Chef, Ann Taylor and Talbots.

If you are an "antique freak," then head to the area that has been dubbed Antique Row starting on the corner of Fair Oaks Ave. and Mission St. in South Pasadena. Green Street, just southeast of Old Town, also has a few antique stores including Shibui, 991 East Green St., 626/578-0908, which specializes in Japanese antiques. The Pasadena Antique Center, 480 South Fair Oaks Ave., 626/449-7706 is an antique cooperative containing 125 shops.

For the scientifically minded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., 818/354-9314, and Mount Wilson Observatory, San Gabriel Mountains north of Pasadena, 626/793-3100, are available. JPL conducts visitor tours on the first and last Mondays of each month. Group tours are also available if booked well in advance (usually 6 months prior). Advance reservations are necessary for both tours. The tour includes the Spacecraft Museum, the Space Flight Operations Facility and the Spacecraft Assembly Facility. For more information about the tours see the JPL Web page.

The Mt. Wilson Observatory has a walking tour of the grounds and a museum although the telescope itself is not accessible. The Observatory is open to the public on the weekends 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

After a day of sightseeing, Pasadena has much to offer in the way of dining and entertainment. Whether you want to enjoy a good play or laugh it up at a comedy show, to find out exactly what is going on pick up a copy of the Pasadena Weekly or LA Weekly. These free newspapers can usually be found outside shops or grocery stores -- the new weekly comes out every Thursday.

Pasadena has two live theaters, the famous Pasadena Playhouse, 39 South El Molino Ave., 626/356-7529, and the more avant-garde Knightsbridge Theatre in the Braley Building, 35 South Raymond Ave., 626/440-0821. Scheduled to be playing at the Playhouse in May 1999 is Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. The Knightsbridge Theatre, once a basement storage area until it was converted into a theater in 1992, usually has several plays running in repertory. On the schedule for May 1999 are Shadowlands, Wuthering Heights and An Ideal Husband. Comedy shows can be seen at the Pasadena Ice House and Ice House Annex, 24 North Mentor Ave., 626/577-1894.

There are plenty of pubs in and around Old Town which provide a variety of live music. For rock and R&B try the Old Towne Pub, 66 North Fair Oaks Ave., 626/ 577-6583, McMurphy's, 72 North Fair Oaks Ave., 626/666-1445, or the John Bull Pub, 958 South Fair Oaks Ave., 626/441-4353. The Baked Potato, 26 East Colorado Blvd., 626/564-1122, has some of the best live jazz music around and for country and folk music, see what's up at Beckham Place, 77 West Walnut, 626/796-3399.

I've tried to pinpoint a few of the more interesting sights and give you a taste of Pasadena. For further information on other nearby attractions, entertainment and dining visit the City of Pasadena Web pages. Also, check out the Los Angeles Chapter of ASIS (LACASIS) Web pages for links and recommendations from local librarians. Hope to see you here in Pasadena at the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting!

Louisa Toot is technical reference librarian at the California Institute of Technology. She can be reached by e-mail at louisa@library.caltech.edu

ASIS Mid-Year Meeting
Features Networked Information and Resources

Access to and use of networked information resources and services over the Internet continue to explode with new and innovative applications. Exploring the phenomenon of the Internet in the context of improving information services is the theme of the 1999 ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, Evaluating and Using Networked Information Resources and Services.

Meeting in Pasadena, California, May 24-26, conference goers will explore such topics as

  • what we know and don't know about networked resources and services and
  • strategies to improve our knowledge of such resources.
  • According to the meeting planners, the number of domain names on the Internet has increased by 600% in the last three years. Entire network-based communities have been created to provide information and services and to develop social spaces unbounded by geography. Indeed, the networked environment creates opportunities for service innovation, provision, distribution and capabilities well beyond traditional means.

    The development and provision of these innovative services are hindered by our limited knowledge of users and uses of networks, as well as by the lack of ongoing evaluation and assessment of networked resources.

    The increased use and provision of networks and networked information services create the need for understanding the dimensions of electronic networks and the information services provided over such networks. The 1999 ASIS Mid-Year Meeting will address this need and begin to develop strategies for measuring, assessing and classifying electronic networking activities.

    Program chairs for Evaluating and Using Networked Information Resources and Services are Charles McClure, Syracuse University, and John Carlo Bertot, State University of New York at Albany.  Members of the program committee are Michael Crandall, Boeing Company; Paul Kantor, Rutgers University; Carol A. Hert, Indiana University; and Geoffrey Ford, University of Bristol.
     

    Nominations Sought for 1999 ASIS Annual Awards

    Research Award

    The ASIS Research Award recognizes a systematic program of research in a single area at a level beyond the single study and recognizes outstanding research contributions that have had a significant and recent impact on the field.

    Eligibility: The award is open to all individuals in the field of information science.  Nominations: Any person may nominate candidates for the award. 

    Nomination Package: All nominations must include substantiating documentation to demonstrate the nominee's record of research. Copies of publications or other works may be included if they contribute to an understanding of the nominee's work. Deadline: June 1

    Outstanding Information Science Teacher Award

    This award, co-sponsored by Institute for Scientific Information, recognizes sustained excellence and the unique contributions of an individual in the teaching of information science. The honor carries a cash award of $1000 and up to $500 travel reimbursement to the ASIS Annual Meeting. 

    Eligibility: Any individual directly involved in teaching some aspect of information science on a continuing basis, regardless of ASIS membership, is eligible.

    Nominations: Nominations must be made by ASIS members. 

    Nomination Package: Nominating papers must include the nominee's name and address, a 250-word statement of qualifications and nominee's 3-page resume and should be accompanied by supporting evidence, letters of recommendation and testimonials. Deadline: July 1

    UMI Doctoral Dissertation

    The UMI Doctoral Dissertation honors outstanding achievements by information scientists in the completion of dissertation projects. The award consists of a $1000 cash award and $500 travel reimbursement to the ASIS Annual Meeting.

    Eligibility: All information scientists who have completed their dissertations within the past year are eligible. 

    Nomination Package: Nomination packages must include a full dissertation in reproducible format and a letter of endorsement from the dissertation advisor.

    Deadline: June 1

    ISI Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Scholarship

    Co-sponsored by ASIS and the Institute for Scientific Information, this scholarship fosters information science research by encouraging and supporting doctoral students with their dissertation research. The award consists of $1500 and $500 travel reimbursement to the ASIS Annual Meeting.

    Eligibility: All active information science doctoral students enrolled in institutions granting doctoral degrees are eligible. Students must have completed all course work and have received acceptance of their dissertation proposals.

    Nomination Package: Include in 10 double-spaced pages or less a description of the research; schedule for completion; budget and budget justification; names of dissertation advisor and committee members; a letter of endorsement from the student's advisor; and a curriculum vitae. Deadline: July 1

    Pratt-Severn Student Research Award

    This award recognizes substantive work performed by students in the field of information science and encourages research and writing. Since 1996 it has been sponsored by Pratt Institute, School of Information and Library Science, on behalf of the late David Severn, a 1968 Pratt Alumnus. The award consists of $500 travel expenses and full registration for the ASIS Annual Meeting.

    Eligibility: Any student in a master's degree-granting institution can submit a paper that falls within the scope of the Journal of the American Society for Information Science. Doctoral theses are not eligible.

    Nomination Package: The author's name should not appear on the paper itself. The author should be identified only in the accompanying cover letter. The package should include endorsement of the paper by a faculty member. Deadline: June 15

    Best JASIS Paper Award

    This award recognizes the best refereed paper published in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS) each year. Since 1997 it has been sponsored by John Wiley and Sons, Inc. The award consists of $1500 and $500 travel reimbursement to the ASIS Annual Meeting.

    Eligibility: All papers published in the volume year of JASIS preceding the ASIS Annual Meeting are eligible for the award. ("Perspective" articles are eligible). Authors need not be members of ASIS to be eligible for the award.

    Nominations: No nomination procedure is used for this award. All eligible papers are considered.

    Award of Merit

    The Award of Merit, ASIS' highest honor, is awarded annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to the field of information science, either through the expression of a new, revolutionary idea; the development of better information dissemination techniques; substantial research efforts; or outstanding service to the information profession as evidenced by successful efforts in the educational, social or political processes affecting the profession.

    Eligibility: The award is open to all individuals in the field of information science, regardless of nationality, membership in the Society or other limiting factors.

    Nominations: Any ASIS member may nominate candidates for the award. In addition, nominations will be made by the Award of Merit Nominating Committee. 

    Nominations Package: All nominations must be accompanied by substantiating documentation to include the nominee's name, address, a biographical sketch and a description of the particular work or works for which the nominee is to be commended. Copies of publications or other works should be included if they contribute to an understanding of the nominee's work and support the nomination. Five complete copies of a nomination must be sent to HQ.  Deadline: July 1

    Watson Davis Award

    The Watson Davis Award recognizes an individual member of the Society who has shown continuous dedicated service to the membership through active participation in and support of ASIS programs, chapters, SIGs, committees and publications.

    Eligibility: Candidates must have been ASIS members for at least five years. Prior Watson Davis Award winners, members of the Watson Davis Jury and the Membership Committee chair in the year that the award is given are not eligible. Nominations may be made by any member of the Society,  jointly by any chapter or SIG or any other official unit of the Society.

    Nomination Package: Each nomination must be accompanied by documentation which includes at least the following: a letter of nomination with supporting reasons for the choice of the candidate (specific information about the quality and length of service of the nominee, with careful consideration given to the words continuous, service and membership); comprehensive list of the contributions of the member to ASIS; and supporting letters of nomination that provide additional details on the nominee's contributions to the Society.

    Deadline: July 15

    Best Information Science Book Award

    This award recognizes the best book published in the field of information science the preceding year.

    Eligibility: Any book in the broad area of information science is eligible. Authors need not be ASIS members.  

    Nomination: Nominations are accepted from publishers and individuals, regardless of ASIS membership.

    Nomination Package: Publishers must submit two copies of each title being nominated; individuals nominating books need not send copies of the books, but should provide full bibliographic references for each title. Deadline: June 1

    ISI/ASIS Citation Analysis Research Grant

    This grant supports research based on citation analysis by encouraging and assisting individuals with their research. Citation analysis is broadly defined, including but not limited to analyses using resources developed by ISI. Because of the limits proposed by timing considerations, the grant may be made for research underway as well as for new research proposed. The grant consists of $3000 and $500 travel reimbursement to the ASIS Annual Meeting.

    Eligibility: Any individual is eligible without regard to nationality, membership in the Society or other limitation. The Grant is a once-in-a-lifetime award.

    Proposals: Global proposals are sought and may be submitted by anyone. Nominations should be mailed to ISI/ASIS Citation Analysis Research Grant, ISI, 3501 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104.

    Proposal Package: Include the following: name, address, affiliation and brief biography of applicant(s); brief statement of the research problem not to exceed a maximum of 1000 words (double-spaced); description of the research design and methodology, including details of how citation data will be used; discussion of the expected impact of the research results. Proposals may be submitted in hard copy, e-mail or fax. Deadline: June 1

    James M. Cretsos Leadership Award

    This award recognizes a new ASIS member who has demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities in ASIS activities. 

    Eligibility: Any ASIS member who has been a member for no more than seven years (including years as a student member, if applicable) at the time the award is made is eligible to receive the award. Prior winners of this award, members of the current jury and the chair of the Leadership Committee in the year that the award is given are not eligible.

    Nominations: Nominations may come from any member of the Society.

    Nomination package: Nominating letter; no more than two pages of data, including  name of the award; name, title, affiliation, address, telephone number of nominee; name, title, affiliation, address, telephone number of nominator; year the nominee joined ASIS; ASIS activities (SIG, chapter and/or student chapter); participation in chapter programs; participation in chapter or SIG publications; chapter/SIG projects; ASIS committees; and recruitment/retention activities. No more than five letters of support and no more than two supporting documents. Deadlines: July 15

    SIG/STI BIOSIS Student Award

    The SIG/STI BIOSIS Student award recognizes an outstanding library and/or information science student with an interest biological information. The award consists of a cash grant funded by BIOSIS to provide partial support for attendance at an ASIS Mid-Year or Annual Meeting.

    Eligibility: Any student enrolled full-time or part time in a graduate program in library and/or information science with a demonstrated interest in biological information is eligible (full-time enrollment will be given preference). ASIS student membership is not required.

    Nomination Package: An application form should be completed and submitted to SIG/STI. To receive an application form contact Kate McCain, 215/895-2486, by fax at 215/895-2492 or by e-mail: mccainkw@duvm.ocs.drexel.eduDeadline: February 16

    SIG/STI Chemical Abstracts Service Student Award

    The SIG/STI CAS Student award recognizes an outstanding library and/or information science student with an interest in chemical information. The award consists of a cash grant funded by Chemical Abstracts Service to provide partial support for attendance at an ASIS Mid-Year or Annual Meeting.

    Eligibility: Any student enrolled full-time or part time in a graduate program in library and/or information science with a demonstrated interest in chemical information is eligible (full-time enrollment will be given preference). ASIS student membership is not required.

    Nomination Package: An application form should be completed and submitted to SIG/STI. To receive an application form contact Kate McCain, 215/895-2486, by fax at 215/895-2492 or by e-mail: mccainkw@duvm.ocs.drexel.edu.   Deadline: February 16 

    Chapter-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes outstanding chapters for their contributions to ASIS and the advancement of information science.

    Eligibility: All ASIS chapters in good standing are eligible to receive this award. There is no limit on the number of times a chapter may win the award, and more than one chapter may win in a given year. 

    Nomination Package: Six copies of the Chapter Annual Activities Report and Chapter-of-the-Year Criteria and Checklist and attached documentation.

    Deadline: August 15

    Chapter Member-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes the service of an individual to a particular chapter. It is given for significant contributions to the membership of the chapter through participation in and support of its meetings and publications, fund-raising, recruitment or other significant activities. This award recognizes contributions at the local level.

    Eligibility: Any ASIS member who is currently a member of the nominating chapter is eligible to receive this award.

    Nominations shall be solicited by mail from the chapter chairs by the Chapter Assembly Director. Nominations can be made by any ASIS member, but are to be associated with the nominee's activities in a particular chapter.

    Nomination Package: Include a nominating letter with a 250-word description of the contribution for which the person is nominated; the completed Chapter Member-of-the-Year Nomination Form; no more than two letters of support; no more than two supporting documents; and a 50-word citation which may be used for publicity, if the person is chosen to receive the award. Deadline: July 1

    Chapter Event-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes the best event held by a chapter (or jointly by two or more chapters) during the previous year (July-June).

    Eligibility: Any type of chapter event is eligible, including technical programs, seminars, panels, workshops, CE courses, product exhibitions, tutorials, fund raisers or other events. Joint events held with other associations are also eligible.

    Nomination Package: Include a nominating letter which contains a 250-word description of the event which is being nominated; name, address, phone number and chapter name of the person who is submitting the nomination; no more than two letters of support; no more than three supporting documents; 50-word citation which may be used for publicity, if the event is chosen to receive the award. Deadline: July 1

    Chapter Publication-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes the best publication produced by a chapter (or jointly by two or more chapters) during the previous year (July-June).

    Eligibility: Any type of chapter publication is eligible, including newsletters, meeting proceedings, directories or other publications. A publication must be in a format that is readable/usable by the jury members. Any electronic and/or self-published material should be sent to HQ in order to be considered.

    Nomination: No nominations procedure is used for this award. All chapter publications produced in the award year are automatically eligible.

    Student Chapter-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes outstanding student chapters for participation in, and contributions to, ASIS and the advancement of information science.

    Eligibility: All ASIS student chapters in good standing are eligible to receive this award. There is no limit on the number of times a student chapter may win the award, and more than one student chapter may win in a given year.

    Nomination Package consists of the Student Chapter Annual Activities Report and Student Chapter-of-the-Year Criteria and Checklist and attached documentation shall comprise the nomination package.

    Deadline: July 31

    SIG-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes outstanding professional accomplishments and activities of an ASIS Special Interest Group.

    Eligibility: All active ASIS SIGs are eligible to receive this award. More than one awardee may be chosen in a given year. The same SIG may receive the award in consecutive years.

    Nomination Package: SIG Annual Activities Report and SIG-of-the-Year Criteria and Check-list and attached documentation. Deadline: August 15

    SIG Publication-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes the best publication produced by a SIG (or jointly by two or more SIGs) during the previous year (July-June).

    Eligibility: Any SIG publication is eligible, including newsletters, transactions, directories or other publications. A publication must be in a format that is readable/usable by the jury members. Any electronic and/or self-published material should be sent to HQ in order to be considered.

    Nominations: Since the SIG publications are automatically submitted to ASIS Headquarters, there is no formal nomination package for this award. ASIS Headquarters shall provide copies of the eligible publications to the members of the jury.

    Deadline: The first phase of the process shall be completed by September 1

    SIG Member-of-the-Year Award

    This award recognizes the service of an individual to the program of a particular SIG. It is given for significant contributions to the membership of the SIG through participation in and support of its events at the Annual and Mid-Year Meetings, its publications and its other activities. 

    Eligibility: Any ASIS member who is currently a member of the nominating SIG is eligible to receive the award. More than one awardee may be chosen in a given year. The same person may not receive the award in two consecutive years.

    Nomination package: A nominating letter, briefly describing the contributions of the nominee to a specific SIG; list of the nominee's contributions to current SIG activities, no more than two letters of support; and no more than two documents illustrating the nominee's SIG activities.

    Deadline: August 15

    Awards will be presented at the ASIS Annual Meeting, November 1-4, in Washington, DC, unless otherwise noted. Send nominations to ASIS HQ addressed to "Name of the Award," unless otherwise stated. For more information or for copies of complete guidelines for the ASIS Awards, contact ASIS Headquarters at 301/495-0900.
     

    News from ASIS Chapters

    The Southern Ohio Chapter of ASIS (SOASIS) took a look at Digitization of Library Materials as the topic for its January meeting. Alice Cornell, head of the Archives and Rare Books Department at the University of Cincinnati, was to describe how some libraries approach digitization and her university's experience with the development of its Digital Press.

    The ASIS Capital Area (Washington, DC) Student Chapter scheduled a presentation by ASIS president-elect Eugene Garfield for its January meeting. Garfield was to speak on the subject, Information Science and Technology: Looking Backward and Looking Forward.

    In January, the Minnesota Chapter of ASIS, in conjunction with local chapters of SLA and SCIP, was to hear about Managing What Your Corporation Knows and Accelerated Learning for a Digital Age. The first topic was to be addressed by Andy Michuda, president and CEO of Teltech Resource Network Corporation. The second presentation was to be by Erick Thompson, knowledge transfer manager for 3M.
     

    News About ASIS Members

    Howard Besser, visiting associate professor in the School of Information Management and Systems at the University of California at Berkeley, will join the Department of Library and Information Science at the University of California at Los Angeles as associate professor, while retaining his appointment at Berkeley for another year.

    Peter Hernon, professor at the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science, is co-author of the recently published Assessing Service Quality: Satisfying the Expectations of Library Customers.

    Martha J. Bailey has published the second book in her series on women scientists, American Women in Science: 1950 to the Present: A Biographical Dictionary. The volume includes 300 women in science, engineering, mathematics and social and behavioral sciences.

    Blaise Cronin, dean of the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University, has been named the James H. Rudy Professor of Information Science. His appointment as Rudy Professor, a permanent position, was approved by the trustees of the university in December.

    Linda Smith, associate dean and professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been honored with the ALISE Award for Teaching Excellence.

    Tomas A. Lipinski, assistant professor, and Thomas D. Walker, associate professor, both in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Library and Information Science, have been named co-directors of the school's new Center for Information Policy Research. The center will facilitate and carry out research in social, ethical, economic, legal and technical aspects of information and information technologies.

    Howard D. White, professor in the Drexel University College of Information Science and Technology, has been selected to receive a Drexel Distinguished Professorship. The five-year award provides funding for research activities and expenses.

    John Carlo Bertot, associate professor at the State University of New York, Albany, and Charles R. McClure, distinguished professor at Syracuse University, have been awarded a research grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Service. The project is entitled, Developing National Public Library Statistics and Performance Measures for the Networked Environment.

    Yin Zhang, doctoral student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is the 1999 winner of the ALISE Methodology Paper Competition. The honor includes a cash prize and the opportunity to present a summary of her paper at the ALISE annual conference


    OBITUARY

    Mary Hanley

    Mary Hanley, 76, former librarian in the Bio-Medical Library at the University of Minnesota and instructor at the university for 28 years, died in late December. Mary was a past president of the ASIS Minnesota chapter, serving in the early 1980s, and she was an active local chapter member until her retirement.


     

    News from Institutional Members

    CoLIS 3 Features ASIS Connections

    The upcoming 3rd International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science (CoLIS 3) has numerous ASIS connections. Among the organizing universities are University of Tampere, Finland, and Rutgers University, both institutional members of ASIS. The European Chapter of ASIS is one of two cooperating sponsors of the conference.

    Tefko Saracevic, former ASIS president and Rutgers professor, is program chair for the meeting which will address the topic, Digital Libraries: Interdisciplinary Concepts, Challenges and Opportunities. The meeting will be held May 23-26 in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

    Among the many invited or scheduled speakers, presenters and authors for the meeting are several ASIS members, including the following: Ed Fox, Virginia Tech; Michael Buckland, University of California at Berkeley and immediate past president of ASIS; Diane Sonnenwald, University of North Carolina; Bryce Allen, University of Missouri-Columbia; Rafael Capurro, Stuttgart, Germany; Amanda Spink, University of North Texas; Colleen Cool, Queens College, CUNY; Louise Su, University of Pittsburgh; Hsin-liang Chen, Pittsburgh; Preben Hansen, Swedish Institute of Computer Science; Paul Kantor, Rutgers University; and  Philip Doty, University of Texas at Austin.

    Pitt to Endow LIS Chair

    The University of Pittsburgh has received a $1.5 million gift from the Buhl Foundation to establish an endowed chair in Library and Information Science in Pitt's School of Information Science (SIS).

    Named in honor of Doreen Boyce, the Buhl Foundation's president, the Doreen E. Boyce Chair in Library and Information Science is one of the very few chairs established specifically for library and information science in the nation and the first chair in Pitt's SIS.

    SIS Dean Toni Carbo says a search is likely to begin in the spring to identify a scholar to hold the chair.


     

    Seniors Online: PVC Chapter Volunteers to Help

    by Trudi Bellardo Hahn

    As ASIS members are well aware, one of the biggest cultural, economic and educational developments of the 1990s has been the explosive growth of the Internet and, especially, the World Wide Web. We know that virtually every sector of society has been impacted, and the rate of adoption and use has been nothing but phenomenal. However, not all groups have had equal opportunity of access; senior citizens and retirees have been among those who have lagged behind. Only a privileged few seniors have the money for equipment and access, the technical background to set it up and maintain it, and a relative or friend to show them how to use it.

    For most seniors, the reality is that many roadblocks stand in the way of getting on the information superhighway. The barriers include economics (how will they pay for computers, modems, Internet accounts?), maintenance (how will they troubleshoot the hardware and software problems that inevitably arise after a system is installed?), training (if they are not working or going to school, how will they learn to use the Internet?) or mental blocks and poor motor skills (how can they overcome fear and suspicion of computers, lack of typing skills, failing eyesight, weak hand control or other disabilities?).

    The Potomac Valley Chapter of ASIS has a history of fund-raising and using chapter funds for projects other than just newsletters and programming, specifically to support outreach programs that benefit the general community. In this tradition, the Executive Board of PVC in 1997 authorized the expenditure of chapter funds to purchase a state-of-the-art computer and large monitor. They donated the equipment and a  subscription to an Internet Service Provider to the seniors living at St. Mary's Court, an independent living facility in downtown Washington, DC. St. Mary's Court is HUD-subsidized and ethnically mixed. A few of the residents work part-time, but most are retired. Nearly all have very limited incomes.

    Four PVC members (Ione Auston, Trudi Bellardo Hahn, Clare Imholz and Kathleen Mullen) volunteered to provide the technical support and training. Trudi prepared written materials, Kathleen and her husband installed the computer and Ione obtained the loan of a laser printer from the National Library of Medicine and installed it. Beginning in the fall of 1997, the four volunteers took turns visiting St. Mary's Court to provide training in using the Web and assisting residents in setting up free Juno e-mail accounts.

    The training mainly took the form of informal coaching, with a few directions on how to surf the Web and use JUNO e-mail and a few hints and tricks. The primary mode of teaching, however, was to sit back and watch while the seniors took turns on the computer themselves. In spite of their physical limitations in eyesight and hand control, which made the keyboarding process slow and laborious, they grasped the principles of the Web browser quickly. Soon they were clicking on links, typing in URLs, jumping forward and back and saving bookmarks. The volunteers suggested topics and sites to explore, but often the seniors had their own notions of where they wanted to go on the Web, to places we never could have anticipated. For example, one Spanish-speaking senior wanted to read about the ancient Incan capital, Macchu Picchu. We showed her how to specify Spanish-language only and enter the terms in a search engine (with several false starts on the spelling). Soon she was happily examining historic photographs of the archeological ruins of the lost city.

    Recently, we polled the participating seniors at St. Mary's Court about how they felt about our outreach project, and these comments were among the responses:

    Wilbert enjoyed finding the "Postcards from the Beach" site and will be visiting the Virtual Florist next.

    Hakela has mastered e-mail and says she feels like a graduate from preschool to kindergarten when she surfs the Web.

    Joan wonders what she did before ASIS donated the computer, and will be eternally grateful for their generosity. Between e-mailing friends as well as foes (government officials) and exploring unknown territory on the Net, there is little time left for serious mischief!

    Paul is a recent arrival on the computer; he will be joining online chess games a few lessons from now.

    Josie, who was ill this summer, was looking forward to a new round of classes as her health improved.

    Laura and Barbara were thrilled to find bridge lessons on the Web; now they can join the St. Mary's Court Bridge Club.

    Cecile was sure she would hate the computer and she almost did not bother trying . . . but "now I LOVE IT!" She corresponds with her son in Florida, reads the online newspapers from Daytona and Orlando (where she once owned and managed a motel) and goes into orbit whenever there is a glitch in JUNO (the free e-mail system they use). Cecile can use only her left hand (right side paralyzed by stroke), but does not let that deter her.

    Speaking for the rest, Joan added "a special thanks from all of us to our coaches for donating their Wednesday evenings. Your patience and good will -- and faith in our aging abilities -- has sent our morale soaring."

    Joan sent this message via e-mail, of course.

    Trudi Bellardo Hahn works in User Education Services at the University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. She can be reached by phone at 301/405-9254; by fax at 301/314-9416 and, of course, by e-mail at th90@umail.umd.edu

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    @ 1999, American Society for Information Science
    Last Update: February 21, 1999